About Us

Advocacy

The Association acts as a consumer-advocate group on behalf of the Deaf community. GVAD has gone to governments, private agencies and businesses whenever important issues relating to Deaf people have come up. Many times, the GVAD has made presentations to city, provincial and federal governments regarding the education of deaf children and adults, communication (telephone access and television captioning), health care issues and provision of interpreting services. Examples: Medical Interpreting and Services Telus Relay Service.

Volunteers

As with many non-profit groups, the GVAD depends heavily on volunteers. The Board of Directors is made up of Deaf volunteers who give their time and skills to make GVAD a successful organization. Volunteers run all of the committees. The GVAD is proud of its volunteers and their energy and spirit. We welcome inquiries from the community to volunteer. The only necessary skill is to be able to communicate in American Sign Language.

Working with Others

GVAD works closely with many other organizations serving people who are Deaf or have disabilities. Some of these groups are: the BC Deaf Sports Federation, Disability Alliance BC , BC Cultural Society of the Deaf, Deaf Children’s Society of BC, Deaf, Hard of Hearing, and Deaf-Blind Well Being Program, Family Network for Deaf Children, and the Canadian Association of the Deaf.

Activities

CornFest is GVAD's major fundraising event as well as the most popular event of the year. Other events include informative workshops and courses, one-day excursions for seniors, and other recreational activities and events. GVAD also is involved in planning events for the International Week of the Deaf, held during the last full week of September.
 
The GVAD has developed a number of different programs, including supporting the Deaf-Blind adult community, notably hosting a weekly Deaf-Blind Drop-In for individuals to socialize and play games. The Deaf-Blind Planning Committee advises the GVAD on the needs of the Deaf-Blind Community.

Fundraising

The Greater Vancouver Association of the Deaf depends primarily on its membership dues,  fundraising events and gaming revenue to generate funds for its general operations. Other special projects are funded through government grants when possible. The Association also depends on donations from the community to make it possible for its staff and many volunteers to answer the many inquiries and requests for information and assistance.

Where the funds go:

  • Building-to-be (Deaf Resource Centre)
  • Office Equipment
  • Events
  • Supplies
  • Workshops/courses/seminars
  • History Archives
  • Others

Local Programs

GVAD will often have programs for local groups such as youth, seniors, and Deaf-Blind people. These workshops and social activities are organized to provide educational, employment and social networking opportunities to these specialized groups.